[Guide] The best way to learn programming


#21

I am a (web)programmer and interested in programming since age of 6.
It takes a lot of practicing to achieve a level of knowledge.
What I saw you can learn it in school but you won’t be as perfect as if you would learned it on your own (with a help of online materials).
I learned PHP first with inspecting a PHP-Nuke based template (omg it was so long times ago…), then a lot of books, stackoverflow + searching in google.
I would suggest Lynda.com courses. Others mentioned it before but Udemy courses are also good.


#22

You can also do a search on https://www.mooc-list.com.

You’ll find free online courses and Massive Open Online Courses by providers like FutureLearn, Coursera, etc also Udemy, many of the courses are from universities like MIT, Reading, London, Purdue, etc and Microsoft.

Good Luck


#23

I am self taught at age 13 I started. Basic was my first language and got serious in my mid 20’s, I then wrote a library of functions that at that time was one of the best in assembler and some C. This was before object oriented programming was born yet out of AT&T. I programmed for a living until the companies started out sourcing to India and Russia.
Delphi and assembler in general commercial products. I retired from coding and haven’t touched it in years. Coding needs time and patience to learn. The tools now are visual in the popular languages C sharp or even c++. First learn any program…it’s structure…methods and functions and loops etc.
see, principles or the basics of languages are more the same then different. Only a few ways to do a loop such as 'if p == this then ’ etc. the greatest thing to learn is simple…dedicate learning the basics.
How is the code source declared and how to call other items via directly (pointer based ) indirectly etc.
Many great resources out there …
Regarding school teaching…you learn that’s true…but programming is a weird task. Most can code with today’s tools because the hard work is done. It takes dedication and love actually to be a good coder. In a nutshell you either got what it takes or you don’t. That simple because coding itself while is simple, it takes a affinity to people who can think in code to make it happen. School does not teach that


#24

I know that this thread is one year old, but if someone is still looking for a solution to easily learn programming, here’s what I have to say:
If you don’t have a college degree, don’t sweat it, you can still make it. The industry is still growing and there’s so much demand for programmers that can be productive that any serious company will not reject you on the grounds of education alone. If you can demonstrate your results and that you can get the job done, you will be hired and you can potentially earn quite a lot off it (go figure, lol).

I picked up the absolute basics at codecademy, then learned Ruby on Rails and proceeded to work as a cheaply paid employee at a local web agency. Then I switched to corp and here I am now, writing real solutions for real people.

Just make sure you keep learning and doing finished products. These days, a good Github account can literally land you a job. And gotta say, understanding coding / technology is going to help you a lot in Internet Marketing.


#25

At the moment I don’t have the funds to hire a professional that teaches me the ropes.
I started out with Codecademy, the way they teach is really hands on and that’s very nice for all the basics, only you can’t do real life projects with it. I’m creating web automation tools with Selenium and they don’t teach you that.

I’m going to check out Lynda and Udemy for some extra knowledge, thanks!


#26

I started in udemy, then i made a Fullstack Developer Nanodegree and another one for React / React Native and Redux in Udacity. As soon as you learn 1 programming language (i started with javascript), the next one will be easy (my second language is python for backend)