Net Neutrality ban - What's next?


#1

As you may or may not have noticed, the US and A banned Net Neutrality a few weeks ago.

What do you think is going to do that on how we perceive the internet?
Will we have to pay for certain things now to unblock them?

I think if the internet providers decide to block certain content and/or make us pay for it, other services will simply provide us with a free solution. Talking about companies like Facebook, Tesla, Google or Microsoft…


#2

to be honest i dont think this will work as media says, the US is so competitive that other companies will start to offer better deals than the one that start applying the pay per user thing.


#3

I can imagine that services like Netflix Amazon etc. will combine their powers to give us free internet bundled with all the stuff they have…

Was probably just another move by Trump to conceal some of the things that happened in the background during that time


#4

I do not know how things are arranged in the US. But here the infrastructure is owned by 2 big companies who look at each other well. If one raises the prices the other follows also. So there is not much competition. And for a new company to start it would mean an enormous investment. It will not be free.

Some companies suggested to ask extra money for receiving Netflix. Fortunately this is not allowed. We already pay enough! I am very curious about what will happen in the US.


#5

That’s not really how it works. The big ISPs didn’t like Netflix “use their pipes”, so they charge Netflix to use them or the speed is throttled ( in my tests it’s still throttled anyways). So Netflix has to pass that cost on or absorb it. Smaller companies can’t absorb that cost, so they will have to pass it on. They could charge for access to your favorite sites, and probably will soon. But what’s already happening is very small charges that they don’t earn you about.


#6

What do you mean by ‘Netflix is using the ISPS’ pipes’?

Netflix is simply hosting the content on their servers and it doesn’t matter if you access it via mobile data, ISP A or ISP B…

What I could see happening is that ISPS now make different packages and throttle some services that they think can make them a lot of money.


#7

That traffic has to flow through ISPs. That’s how the internet works. ISPs allow each other to use their networks for their combined benefit.

It’s called “peering”.

So the IPSs look at the large amount of traffic going to Netflix, and Netflix doesnt pay for the actual connectivity, you do.

So they see that Netflix is using a ton of bandwidth, and think “how do we get a price of that?”.

They also try to squeeze more out of us, the end consumer of those products.

Comcast increased my speed by 100% but in order to get netflix to stream better I would actually need to double what I currently have.

While the speed at my router and computer are fast, the speed at which Netflix streams is actually around half the speed for which I paid. There are several tests you can do to see this effect. They do the same for Youtube etc.


#8

That’s interesting, didn’t know it works like that…also didn’t read the whole thing.

I still don’t understand why they lift the neutrality though, they must’ve seen it coming that more and more people will use the internet and services like streaming…


#9

@MyFocus that is definitely the assumption, that streaming will be THE way of watching television/movies etc in the future (and already trends heavily this way). Netflix just came out with “Bright” which is arguably the 1st big screen quality movie to be released directly on a streaming platform, and Amazon is starting to push its TV shows much harder. As the availability of top tier content comes out on streaming services first, the assumption is more people will use those services, and use them more often over cable.


#10

I don’t think it will be as bad as others are saying, but I do hope that it doesn’t increase the price of online stuff